keeping up with the kardashians

I’m Probably Naive For Saying This, But I’d Be a Bit Sad if Travis Cheated on Kylie

1) I’m a huge fan of Travis Scott’s music so I don’t want him to be a philandering asshole, but since I am such a fan of his music and not against the messages in his music I’ll still remain a fan even if he’s a cheater…I’ll just like him a little less.

2) I love Kylie Jenner and I feel for her. Yes, I think her life is waaaaaaayyyyyyyy easier than so many people. She is not starving and she isn’t living in a war torn country, BUT I think that the family she’s grown up with would have undoubtedly put alot of pressure on her to get as sexy and beautiful as quickly as possible. No, I don’t think Kris Jenner or anyone else would have ever directly told Kylie “get hot and beautiful asap” as a child, but clearly the family makes money off of how hot and beautiful they are. So it’s easy to imagine Kylie feeling affected by what her family promotes to make money.  The family’s hotness is also why I’m in interested in the Kardashian/Jenner’s, so I’m a part of the problem/it’s not all the KarJenner’s fault. Nevertheless, Kylie is only 21 and I think that she has to feel some sort of intense psychological pressure to try to look good all the time/maintain her brand and perform as well as her female siblings. That would be hard on one’s mental health in my opinion.

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3) Before the whole Jordyn Woods/Tristan Thompson hook-up supposedly went down, I wondered whether Travis and Jordyn had ever hooked-up. At that point, I thought it was a crazy idea, but then at the same time, I was asking myself, “Why do I really think it’s that crazy?” Jordyn is a gorgeous girl. Just as gorgeous as Kylie. Travis is a young man, and even people with the best of intentions often fail. Beauty is tempting! I read Jordyn as someone who would probably be loyal to Kylie to the core, so the Tristan Thompson scandal has been surprising. Yet, it’s not the end of the world. I get it if Khloe, Kylie and the others in the KarJenner family don’t want to hang out with Jordyn anymore, but the rest of society needs to take a moment, breath, and let Jordyn off the hook. If Jordyn got with Tristan it would mean that both Tristan and Jordyn were acting shady…BUT  Tristan much more so than Jordyn, since he’s the one that owes his loyalty to Khloe (if they’re in a monogamous relationship) and since he has a baby with Khloe. I do need to point out that, from what I recall, Tristan started dating Khloe when his ex had either just given birth or was pregnant with Tristan’s son Prince. Tristan’s love ’em and leave ’em pattern was established prior to Khloe.

Even if 21 year-old Jordyn hooked up with Tristan, it doesn’t mean she’s evil or a homewrecker! The person in the relationship who cheats is the homewrecker in my opinion, not the person outside of it. Jordyn might have made a mistake, but it doesn’t mean she should have to hide inside away from the prying eyes of the public for the next 10 years. A lot of us have made mistakes like Jordyn, so I foresee this helping her career IN THE LONG RUN, not necessarily right away. Maybe some haven’t done anything like what Jordyn apparently did, but then I think the mistake people make is judging “the other woman” or man way more harshly than they deserve to be judged.

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4) Point blank: it would be excruciatingly painful to be cheated on by someone you have a young child with. I’ve been with guys who I’m monogamous with and obsessed with and they would have sex with others and rub it in my face, but we weren’t in a relationship and I most definitely didn’t have a kid with them…and it still hurt me so bad and in one situation contributed to a mental breakdown! If Kylie did just get cheated on that is so mean and insensitive of Travis. Hopefully, he’ll give Kylie space if he cheated instead of stringing her along. If Travis isn’t faithful and wants to hook up with lots of girls that’s totally ok. What’s not ok is lying to the person you supposedly love. People who do that make a leap from being honest about carnal desires to being downright douchebags.

Anyways, since we don’t actually know what’s going on behind closed doors (and we’ll never know the full story but it seems right now we don’t even have confirmation of part of the story) there is no point in assuming anything about Travis Scott, Kylie Jenner, Jordyn Woods, Tristan Thompson or Khloe Kardashian.

For all those people who’d say, “why do you care about these people’s lives anyways?” I’d say because you get attached to people whether you’re watching them in the public eye or know them in real life…and also because most of us can relate to being played by shady people and being shady ourselves. Nobody’s perfect, but all of us have felt the pain of betrayal and so it is interesting to see how someone like Kylie, who I do care about, will deal with this alleged cheating situation, especially since she is also raising her young daughter, Stormi, with Travis. Travis and Kylie’s lives are intertwined in a permanent way because they share a child.

One thing this reminds me of is that personal relationships aren’t ever easy!

Embrace Your Freakishness!

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After it poured outside for most of the day, it finally turned sunny out just after 4, so I got off my butt and headed out onto Main Street with the hopes of finding some sweet soul to interview.

Brittney’s look appealed to me, and when I asked her if I could interview her she obliged. Her answer to my question about whether or not she’s ever felt like a freak or an outsider, and if she has what’s helped her through it, was great. Brittney (brittney@laceembrace.com) suggests “EMBRACING IT”–how apropos considering she works at Lace Embrace. I wholeheartedly agree. As they say, let your freak flag fly!

If you’re ever interested in a corset, sexy lingerie, old-fashioned clothing, or pin-up style outfits go visit Brittney at Lace Embrace Atelier on Main (or check out Scout just off Main which is owned by the same person).

UnREAL: Realistic Representation of Reality TV

I started watching UnREAL on Thursday. It is now Saturday, and I have just finished watching all 10 episodes of the 1st season of this outstanding scripted dramedy. UnREAL is about the behind-the-scenes action on a fictional reality TV show called “Enchanted”.

I am a huge fan of reality TV. As a teacher, it is my job to be sociable, patient, friendly, and emotionally available to students during the day, so I look forward to getting home from school, downloading a reality show, and being able to zone-out and observe different personality types and drama without having to react to them…or smile…or respond in any way. Therefore, I find these shows highly entertaining, and, yes, relaxing.

While I am a fan, I would also be an idiot if I were to deny the fact that the aspects of humanity that reality TV shows use to create drama are primarily negative. I believe that my life has been positively impacted by some of the stories I have seen shared on reality TV, but there are also many values that are promoted on most of these shows that are disgusting: judging women and men based on their physical appearance alone, taking advantage of people’s insecurities and/or mental health issues, and reinforcing racist, sexist, homophobic, and various other stereotypes about people.

UnREAL is the first scripted show that I have watched that honestly deals with the types of people who would choose to produce and work on reality TV shows. For example, the show’s protagonist, Rachel, is a producer. She is willing to use any information and any angle she can think of (and she can think of many since she is a highly intelligent and perceptive person) to get something exciting for the cameras.

One of the characters on “Enchanted” is Mary, who is a single mother, and she recently got out of an abusive relationship. For “good TV” Rachel finds Mary’s abusive ex-partner and brings him on the show to confront Mary and the “Bachelor” character, Adam, without Mary or Adam’s awareness that the ex was going to suddenly appear. A fight ensues, and Mary’s situation becomes incredible tragic (likely due to this and because of another factor that a different drama-hungry producer on the show stoops to an all-time low to create) as the series progresses.

This situation reminds me that drama is exciting, and it is a great distraction from my own life, but the lengths reality TV shows creators and producers will go to to provide me with “entertainment” can irreparably harm real people’s lives. Since I consume those shows, I am also contributing to the destruction of people’s lives.

Even though it would be easy to shrug it off and say these reality TV show characters/people/performers are asking for it by going on these shows instead of getting “normal” day jobs, UnREAL highlights how many of these shows are using desperate people, who may have pre-existing mental health problems, and exploiting them. I think that part of the stigma surrounding mental health is that people are blamed for their sickness, and the ridicule that is heaped on people who act “crazy” is somehow viewed as completely acceptable. I still see a variety of examples that lead me to believe that most of mainstream society still thinks that “insane” people are not sick people; instead, they’re bad people. When people who have “freak-outs” on these shows are discussed on social media, in real-life, and in the media the dialogue surrounding them must only make it that much harder for these people to move on from having a mental breakdown on national TV and build a life away from reality TV.

Most people want to claim that they are sensitive to people who are mentally ill, but based on what I have heard people say in real-life when talking about people who have been depressed, acted bizarrely, or erratically there usually seems to be a complete lack of compassion. On the one hand, people who exhibit a lack of self-control and bad behaviour should not be rewarded or given a pat on the back, but on the other hand, if a person is clearly not well or of a sound mind, does it really help to gossip about them and treat them like there’s something wrong with them?

During the summer, I biked to UBC to go to Wreck Beach. While I was locking up my bike at the tops of the stairs there was a man about 15 feet away who was screaming and shouting about “Pigs” (the police, I assume). I would characterize him as mentally-ill. He later walked around the beach area screaming at someone/something that was not there, and I am not a mental health professional, but he seemed delusional. There were a few young men across the street from the bike rack area who were taunting the man and making fun of him. When I see people, who would likely describe themselves as sane, do this sort of cruel thing it reminds me of how ignorant we all are about mental health and what it means to be mentally ill.

The biggest problem is not the man who was ranting and raving, instead it is the “sane” people who pick-on sick people, thereby increasing people’s paranoia and fear. Yet, my own choice to obsessively watch reality TV shows that do the same sort of thing, and much worse, to people who are already in a weak position in terms of their state-of-mind, makes me wonder if I am any different from those young guys who were yelling at the man who seemed mentally ill? I will keep on watching reality TV, but UnREAL provides a lot of food for thought about what I am actually taking part in when I watch these kinds of exploitative shows.

Up until now this article has been a downer, but UnREAL is not only dark and thought-provoking, it’s also hilarious. The characters are complex, lovable, imperfect, believable, and so brutally honest that a lot of the dialogue made me laugh. Shiri Appleby plays Rachel to superb perfection. Rachel does so many things wrong to other people, but we get to see that she is also seriously struggling with her mental health and her own personal life is just as negative as her work life. Rachel is always trying to figure out what she can use other people for, instead of focusing on what she can do to truly help them. I think that if people are being honest we all have the same thing in ourselves. Sometimes, I am more concerned with what I am getting out of an interaction than what I’m giving, but that is something I want to work on minimizing.

Rachel’s boss is Quinn. Quinn is played by Constance Zimmer, and she is everything you’d imagine a ruthless boss bitch would be. But, of course, Quinn also has a heart, and I felt compassion for her, even though I think her behaviour is appalling. Quinn has been having a long-term affair with the show’s executive producer/owner, Chet, played by Craig Bierko. Quinn is not as strong as she seems, and UnREAL illustrates through these characters’ personal lives that there is no on-and-off switch for using and manipulating people.

If you think it is okay to capitalize on people’s weaknesses for a reality show at any cost, then it is likely that you will do the same to people you are dating and friends with. And, they will do the same to you. Since I don’t want to give away any of the important plot points about the show, I will end my review here. If you love or hate reality TV, it doesn’t really matter, because I think this show appeals to both of those categories of people. UnREAL is a genius show in my opinion. Life is complicated, and UnREAL doesn’t shy away from looking at the darkest undercurrents of reality TV. I totally related to all of the main characters, though I’d like to believe I wouldn’t be willing to do what they do, though I’ve done some terrible things in my time. Just like Rachel, Quinn, and Chet, I’m not perfect. I am constantly trying to balance my own selfish desires with what I think will make the world a better place. UnREAL helped me feel better about myself while simultaneously encouraging me to think more deeply about the choices I make in life. Bravo to the show’s creators Marti Noxon and Sarah Gertrude Shapiro!

 

Catch-Up on THE COMEBACK Before Season 2 Starts

I had seen about half of an episode of LISA KUDROW‘s and MICHAEL PATRICK KING‘s HBO series from 2005 called THE COMEBACK a while back, but I never really gave it a chance. I remember hearing one of the Olsen twins saying that it was one of their favourite series, and that stuck out to me for some reason. I kept hearing about the show despite its cancellation after one season.

Poster for the TV series The Comeback

The Comeback poster: source.

Well, after a 9 year hiatus, the show returns for its second season next Sunday November 9th on HBO, and I am very excited to watch it! Yesterday I downloaded season 1 of THE COMEBACK, and I watched all 13 episodes over the last 2 days.

Since I consider myself to be reality TV addict, the show’s premise is perfect in my mind: KUDROW plays VALERIE CHERISH, a washed-up sitcom actress who agrees to film a reality show about her life while working on a new sitcom.

The Comeback

The cast of the fictional sitcom ROOM AND BORED on THE COMEBACK: source.

The new sitcom has 4 young, “hot” stars living together and Valerie Cherish is playing the supposedly unattractive, old aunt named AUNT SASSY. The sitcom is called ROOM AND BORED and it’s super cheesy and insulting to women, and lots of groups of people for that matter. For example, Cherish stands up to the writers when she is expected to say a line about a batch of puppies potentially turning into Korean BBQ. Cherish previously starred in a popular courtroom sitcom called I’M IN IT. When Valerie is complaining to the white, male writers she cites an example from the last season of I’M IN IT when there was a Rodney King joke too soon after the riot. She thinks it led the show to be cancelled.

Lisa Kudrow aka Valerie Cherish as Aunt Sassy: source.

Being racist towards Korean people and making fun of Rodney King’s death is not funny in any way, shape, or form. What makes the show smart and funny is the way it identifies how so many popular sitcoms on supposedly “politically correct” stations regularly air material that I find to be totally unfunny. There are shows I’ve seen where it seems like every joke is based on stereotypes of others. The humour on THE COMEBACK is self-reflective. Valerie is learning how to be a better human being, not just hate on others. This is the type of humour I relate to and feel good watching.

Therefore, I did not find the show to be racist or sexist. Instead it was refreshing and hilarious to see the challenges Valerie Cherish faces while trying to ensure the sitcom isn’t offensive to viewers. Yet, Valerie is not perfect. She assumes her Asian make-up artist is Korean, and apologizes to her for the offensive joke. The make-up artist points out she is Japanese. Valerie tries to cover her own ass by saying that she wouldn’t want to offend the make-up artists’ Korean friends then. The make-up artist asks why Valerie assumes she has Korean friends. There’s lots of awkward social situations like this one on THE COMEBACK that are funny and realistic. I think we’ve all either observed these scenarios or been a part of them (on both ends) where you, or someone else, is trying to be sensitive but end up creating the opposite effect.

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Valerie Cherish taking a bath (wearing a swimsuit of course, since she doesn’t do nudity): source.

The reality TV film crew is led by LAURA SILVERMAN (SARAH SILVERMAN‘S sister) as the character JANE. You often see that the lines between Valerie’s own personal life and her connection to the crew are blurred. For example, one of her fellow co-stars shows up incredibly late for lunch. While Valerie is waiting, she unsuccessfully tries to coerce Jane to join her at the table, so she doesn’t feel like a loser being filmed eating alone.

VALERIE CHERISH is an inspiring character because she always tries to put on a brave face. Valerie tries to pretend she is A-OK at all times, even though the film crew captures all of the degrading and embarrassing things that happen to Valerie during her pursuit of a successful acting career. LISA KUDROW puts her dramatic acting chops on display also. There are painful and tender moments where Valerie has tears in her eyes, even though she is smiling. I could feel her pain, and I connected to how much it hurts to be rejected. The series has so many funny situations that happens. It was comforting me and making me laugh like crazy. Valerie’s step-daughter is like 10-12 years old and yet she refuses to eat carbs, smokes, and says “Bananas” (one of celebrity stylist RACHEL ZOE‘s trademark lines).

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Valerie on the set of her sitcom Room and Bored: source.

It is an outstanding and intelligent show. Even though the first season aired in 2005, it is especially relevant today. I think it accurately represents why audience’s have become increasingly attracted to seeing people play themselves on reality television. “Being yourself” on reality TV creates a kind of pressure about authenticity that leads to a lot of fakeness. But, at the same time, since these reality shows are capturing people at home, or in semi-natural situations (or with their families like on KEEPING UP WITH THE KARDASHIANS), the viewer gets exposed to honest and vulnerable moments in reality stars lives. These moments are almost always quite unflattering and reveal the person’s ego. But for me, these moments usually lead me to love my favourite reality stars even more, because I realize they are human. Even though they look perfect in still-life images or on Instagram, nobody is perfect and confident at all times. Reality TV makes that abundantly clear, and THE COMEBACK brings that message home and then some!